Atlas International Mail
International Mail Update- Brazil Customs Strikes

Packages and mail to Brazil are experiencing longer than usual transit times due to recent Customs strikes in Brazil.  Backlogged volumes of international mail and parcels are awaiting customs clearance into Brazil.  We will continue to press Brazilian authorities to work towards a quick resolution.

Mailing to Brazil or Latin America? Atlas International Mail has been sending mail and parcels to Central America and South America for 34 years.  Rely on our international mailing expertise whenever your organization has a need to send packages and mail internationally.

E-Commerce Delivery , Epacket , Global Trade , international mail , International Mailing Services , international parcels
International Mail Update- Brazil Customs Strikes

Packages and mail to Brazil are experiencing longer than usual transit times due to recent Customs strikes in Brazil.  Backlogged volumes of international mail and parcels are awaiting customs clearance into Brazil.  We will continue to press Brazilian authorities to work towards a quick resolution.

Mailing to Brazil or Latin America? Atlas International Mail has been sending mail and parcels to Central America and South America for 34 years.  Rely on our international mailing expertise whenever your organization has a need to send packages and mail internationally.

Recent International Postage Rate Increases for 2024
International Postage  Below is a summary of recent international postage rate increases.

USPS Shipping Rates – Increase Proposed for January 21, 2024

The United States Postal Service filed notice with the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC) of international postage price changes to take effect on January 21, 2024. The proposed rates need to be approved by the PRC.

Canada Post Parcel Rates Increased on September 11, 2023

Canada Post implemented a parcel rate increase on September 11, 2023. Further surcharges began on October 30, 2023, and will run during their peak season through January 14, 2024. The overall average increase is approximately 3.4%.

DHL Worldwide Express (January 1, 2024):

DHL Express shipping rates will impose a 5.9% general rate increase on its U.S.-originating shipments in 2024.

Canadian mailing , Canadian mailing , Direct Mail Marketing , Europe , Global Trade , Uncategorized
Recent International Postage Rate Increases for 2024
International Postage  Below is a summary of recent international postage rate increases.

USPS Shipping Rates – Increase Proposed for January 21, 2024

The United States Postal Service filed notice with the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC) of international postage price changes to take effect on January 21, 2024. The proposed rates need to be approved by the PRC.

Canada Post Parcel Rates Increased on September 11, 2023

Canada Post implemented a parcel rate increase on September 11, 2023. Further surcharges began on October 30, 2023, and will run during their peak season through January 14, 2024. The overall average increase is approximately 3.4%.

DHL Worldwide Express (January 1, 2024):

DHL Express shipping rates will impose a 5.9% general rate increase on its U.S.-originating shipments in 2024.

EU HS Tax Restrictions On International Mail
EU’s Restrictions on HS Tax Codes for International Packages

In recent years, the European Union (EU) has been diligently revising its regulations to streamline international trade and enhance security measures for packages arriving from other countries. As part of these efforts, the EU has imposed stricter restrictions on Harmonized System (HS) tax codes for packages entering its borders. For businesses and individuals relying on international mailing services, understanding these changes is paramount to ensure compliance and avoid potential disruptions in cross-border shipping. In this blog post, we will explore the recent restrictions placed by the EU on HS tax codes for packages, the rationale behind these measures, and how businesses can navigate the evolving landscape to maintain efficient global logistics.

The Significance of HS Tax Codes in International Trade:

Before delving into the EU’s restrictions, it is essential to comprehend the importance of HS tax codes in international trade. HS codes serve as a standardized classification system, facilitating the identification of products crossing borders. These six-digit codes are universally recognized and enable customs authorities to determine the appropriate tariffs, duties, and taxes applicable to imported goods. Properly assigning HS codes on packages ensures transparency and accuracy in customs declarations, thereby facilitating the smooth flow of goods through the international supply chain.

The EU’s Evolving Approach to HS Tax Codes:

The EU has been proactive in its efforts to strengthen trade policies while safeguarding its citizens and businesses. With the growing volume of international shipments, the EU recognized the need for updated regulations on HS tax codes to address potential issues such as under-declaration and misclassification of goods. To achieve these objectives, the EU implemented several restrictions:

a. Increased Verification and Enforcement: To ensure compliance, the EU now conducts more stringent verification processes for HS tax codes declared on incoming packages. Customs authorities may subject packages to thorough inspections, verifying the accuracy of HS codes and declared values.

b. Improved Data Sharing: The EU has enhanced its data-sharing capabilities with other countries to cross-check information on shipments. This helps identify irregularities and potential discrepancies in HS codes or declared values.

c. Penalties for Non-Compliance: Non-compliance with the EU’s HS tax code restrictions can lead to penalties, delays, or even the refusal of entry for packages. Businesses and individuals must be vigilant in providing accurate information and adhering to the EU’s guidelines.

Rationale Behind the EU’s Restrictive Measures:

The EU’s tightening of HS tax code restrictions is rooted in several important factors:

a. Revenue Protection: Ensuring that accurate import duties and taxes are collected is crucial for the EU’s revenue generation. By cracking down on under-declaration or misclassification of goods, the EU aims to protect its financial interests and maintain a level playing field for all businesses.

b. Counteracting Illicit Trade: The EU is committed to combating illicit trade and counterfeit products. Proper classification of goods through HS tax codes aids in identifying illegal or unauthorized items, bolstering consumer safety and supporting legitimate businesses.

c. Fair Competition: By enforcing stringent regulations, the EU aims to promote fair competition among businesses. Properly identifying products and their corresponding HS codes ensures that all entities play by the same rules, preventing unfair advantages for non-compliant operators.

Navigating the EU’s HS Tax Code Restrictions:

For businesses and individuals utilizing international mailing services, adhering to the EU’s HS tax code restrictions is crucial. Here are some key strategies to navigate this evolving landscape:

a. Accurate Classification: Work closely with your shipping provider to ensure proper HS code classification for each product. Invest in training or seek professional advice to avoid any ambiguity in the codes assigned to your goods.

b. Transparent Documentation: Provide comprehensive and transparent documentation for all packages, including commercial invoices, certificates of origin, and any relevant licenses or permits. Complete and accurate documentation expedites customs clearance and minimizes delays.

c. Stay Updated on Regulations: Regularly monitor the EU’s official resources for updates on HS tax codes and other trade-related regulations. Being proactive in compliance ensures that your business remains compliant with the latest requirements.

d. Partner with Reliable Service Providers: Collaborate with reputable international mailing services experienced in navigating customs regulations. A reliable service provider can assist in compliance, ensuring your packages adhere to the EU’s restrictions.

Final Thoughts

The EU’s recent restrictions on HS tax codes for international packages reflect its commitment to enhancing trade security and efficiency. By implementing stringent verification processes, data sharing, and penalties for non-compliance, the EU aims to protect its financial interests, combat illicit trade, and foster fair competition. For businesses and individuals utilizing international mailing services, understanding and complying with these restrictions are vital for maintaining smooth cross-border operations. Embracing accurate classification, transparent documentation, and a proactive approach to compliance will empower businesses to successfully navigate the EU’s evolving regulatory landscape and continue fostering seamless global logistics.

Europe , Global Trade , international mail , International Mailing Services , Parcel Delivery
EU’s Restrictions on HS Tax Codes for International Packages

In recent years, the European Union (EU) has been diligently revising its regulations to streamline international trade and enhance security measures for packages arriving from other countries. As part of these efforts, the EU has imposed stricter restrictions on Harmonized System (HS) tax codes for packages entering its borders. For businesses and individuals relying on international mailing services, understanding these changes is paramount to ensure compliance and avoid potential disruptions in cross-border shipping. In this blog post, we will explore the recent restrictions placed by the EU on HS tax codes for packages, the rationale behind these measures, and how businesses can navigate the evolving landscape to maintain efficient global logistics.

The Significance of HS Tax Codes in International Trade:

Before delving into the EU’s restrictions, it is essential to comprehend the importance of HS tax codes in international trade. HS codes serve as a standardized classification system, facilitating the identification of products crossing borders. These six-digit codes are universally recognized and enable customs authorities to determine the appropriate tariffs, duties, and taxes applicable to imported goods. Properly assigning HS codes on packages ensures transparency and accuracy in customs declarations, thereby facilitating the smooth flow of goods through the international supply chain.

The EU’s Evolving Approach to HS Tax Codes:

The EU has been proactive in its efforts to strengthen trade policies while safeguarding its citizens and businesses. With the growing volume of international shipments, the EU recognized the need for updated regulations on HS tax codes to address potential issues such as under-declaration and misclassification of goods. To achieve these objectives, the EU implemented several restrictions:

a. Increased Verification and Enforcement: To ensure compliance, the EU now conducts more stringent verification processes for HS tax codes declared on incoming packages. Customs authorities may subject packages to thorough inspections, verifying the accuracy of HS codes and declared values.

b. Improved Data Sharing: The EU has enhanced its data-sharing capabilities with other countries to cross-check information on shipments. This helps identify irregularities and potential discrepancies in HS codes or declared values.

c. Penalties for Non-Compliance: Non-compliance with the EU’s HS tax code restrictions can lead to penalties, delays, or even the refusal of entry for packages. Businesses and individuals must be vigilant in providing accurate information and adhering to the EU’s guidelines.

Rationale Behind the EU’s Restrictive Measures:

The EU’s tightening of HS tax code restrictions is rooted in several important factors:

a. Revenue Protection: Ensuring that accurate import duties and taxes are collected is crucial for the EU’s revenue generation. By cracking down on under-declaration or misclassification of goods, the EU aims to protect its financial interests and maintain a level playing field for all businesses.

b. Counteracting Illicit Trade: The EU is committed to combating illicit trade and counterfeit products. Proper classification of goods through HS tax codes aids in identifying illegal or unauthorized items, bolstering consumer safety and supporting legitimate businesses.

c. Fair Competition: By enforcing stringent regulations, the EU aims to promote fair competition among businesses. Properly identifying products and their corresponding HS codes ensures that all entities play by the same rules, preventing unfair advantages for non-compliant operators.

Navigating the EU’s HS Tax Code Restrictions:

For businesses and individuals utilizing international mailing services, adhering to the EU’s HS tax code restrictions is crucial. Here are some key strategies to navigate this evolving landscape:

a. Accurate Classification: Work closely with your shipping provider to ensure proper HS code classification for each product. Invest in training or seek professional advice to avoid any ambiguity in the codes assigned to your goods.

b. Transparent Documentation: Provide comprehensive and transparent documentation for all packages, including commercial invoices, certificates of origin, and any relevant licenses or permits. Complete and accurate documentation expedites customs clearance and minimizes delays.

c. Stay Updated on Regulations: Regularly monitor the EU’s official resources for updates on HS tax codes and other trade-related regulations. Being proactive in compliance ensures that your business remains compliant with the latest requirements.

d. Partner with Reliable Service Providers: Collaborate with reputable international mailing services experienced in navigating customs regulations. A reliable service provider can assist in compliance, ensuring your packages adhere to the EU’s restrictions.

Final Thoughts

The EU’s recent restrictions on HS tax codes for international packages reflect its commitment to enhancing trade security and efficiency. By implementing stringent verification processes, data sharing, and penalties for non-compliance, the EU aims to protect its financial interests, combat illicit trade, and foster fair competition. For businesses and individuals utilizing international mailing services, understanding and complying with these restrictions are vital for maintaining smooth cross-border operations. Embracing accurate classification, transparent documentation, and a proactive approach to compliance will empower businesses to successfully navigate the EU’s evolving regulatory landscape and continue fostering seamless global logistics.

Postal Remuneration Boring but Important

UPU Postal Remuneration is Boring but Important

Another meeting of the UPU on postal remuneration of terminal dues occurred April 9th. Most likely, you didn’t hear about it. Often times the UPU is not that interesting, but whats happening now could change eCommerce and the global economy for years to come. The UPU (Universal Postal Union) coordinates postal policies of 192 countries. The UPU uses postal remuneration to help developing countries by subsidizing more prosperous countries with terminal dues. As a result the wealthier countries pay a higher share of the costs. Countries are placed in nine different categories based on their level of development. The rates developing countries pay are usually far lower than rates paid by domestic shippers in more developed countries. In some cases, terminal dues are so low that that developed countries like the U.S. actually lose money on mail sent to them internationally from less developed countries like… China?

The USPS is Subsidizing Chinese eCommerce

The UPU categorizes China as a developing country entitling them to huge international postal discounts. China is however, the world’s largest exporter and the second largest economy in the world. The deluge of eCommerce packages from China is costing the USPS, Canada Post, and other international postal services too much. Mail services for small packages shipped from China to the US cost significantly less than what USPS charges American mailers for a domestic service. At the same time, local companies are losing business because they cannot compete with the subsidized postal costs their Chinese competitors benefit from.

The U.S. Will Leave the UPU

The United States must find the UPU Postal Remuneration boring too. Last Year, the U.S. informed the UPU of its decision to withdraw effective 1/1/2020. No doubt, this got the attention of the UPU. An extraordinary postal congress happened September of 2018 with a second meeting this week and another scheduled this September. If a resolution is not found, the US would unilaterally set postal rates for packages entering the United States or increase tariffs again. The postal services and local businesses of countries continue to lose money on eCommerce packages from AliBaba, Ebay, Wish, etc. The USPS loses about $1 on every eCommerce package arriving from China. If a resolution is not found, the impact to the postal systems of the world and global trade will suffer. Imagine the largest economy in the world setting the postal rates of their biggest competitor.

Another Boring UPU Meeting that will Impact the Global Economy

Again, there was another boring UPU meeting this week. So what happened at the meeting? In short, not enough. There are three options being weighed by 192 countries with a vote coming this September. First, allow member countries to self-declare postal rates. Second, accelerate rate increases already approved by the UPU. Finally, the third option that also adopts self-declared rates as its basis, but with elements aimed at mitigating undue price impacts. The next postal remuneration meeting planned September 23-24, impacts every country.  Leaving the UPU now has many unknown consequences. For the USPS, leaving the UPU means negotiating individual postal agreements with every country in the world. That’s a logistical nightmare, in a boring sort of way. 

Follow Us for Less Boring Stuff

Atlas International Mail FacebookAtlas International Mail LinkedInAtlas International Mail to CanadaThe Last Boring UPU Meeting

Interesting Atlas ePackets

This is Boring, I Wanna Go Home

Canadian mailing , Canadian mailing , Direct Mail Marketing , E-Commerce Delivery , Epacket , Europe , Global Trade , international mail , International Mailing Services , Parcel Delivery , Subscription Boxes
Postal Remuneration Boring but Important

UPU Postal Remuneration is Boring but Important

Another meeting of the UPU on postal remuneration of terminal dues occurred April 9th. Most likely, you didn’t hear about it. Often times the UPU is not that interesting, but whats happening now could change eCommerce and the global economy for years to come. The UPU (Universal Postal Union) coordinates postal policies of 192 countries. The UPU uses postal remuneration to help developing countries by subsidizing more prosperous countries with terminal dues. As a result the wealthier countries pay a higher share of the costs. Countries are placed in nine different categories based on their level of development. The rates developing countries pay are usually far lower than rates paid by domestic shippers in more developed countries. In some cases, terminal dues are so low that that developed countries like the U.S. actually lose money on mail sent to them internationally from less developed countries like… China?

The USPS is Subsidizing Chinese eCommerce

The UPU categorizes China as a developing country entitling them to huge international postal discounts. China is however, the world’s largest exporter and the second largest economy in the world. The deluge of eCommerce packages from China is costing the USPS, Canada Post, and other international postal services too much. Mail services for small packages shipped from China to the US cost significantly less than what USPS charges American mailers for a domestic service. At the same time, local companies are losing business because they cannot compete with the subsidized postal costs their Chinese competitors benefit from.

The U.S. Will Leave the UPU

The United States must find the UPU Postal Remuneration boring too. Last Year, the U.S. informed the UPU of its decision to withdraw effective 1/1/2020. No doubt, this got the attention of the UPU. An extraordinary postal congress happened September of 2018 with a second meeting this week and another scheduled this September. If a resolution is not found, the US would unilaterally set postal rates for packages entering the United States or increase tariffs again. The postal services and local businesses of countries continue to lose money on eCommerce packages from AliBaba, Ebay, Wish, etc. The USPS loses about $1 on every eCommerce package arriving from China. If a resolution is not found, the impact to the postal systems of the world and global trade will suffer. Imagine the largest economy in the world setting the postal rates of their biggest competitor.

Another Boring UPU Meeting that will Impact the Global Economy

Again, there was another boring UPU meeting this week. So what happened at the meeting? In short, not enough. There are three options being weighed by 192 countries with a vote coming this September. First, allow member countries to self-declare postal rates. Second, accelerate rate increases already approved by the UPU. Finally, the third option that also adopts self-declared rates as its basis, but with elements aimed at mitigating undue price impacts. The next postal remuneration meeting planned September 23-24, impacts every country.  Leaving the UPU now has many unknown consequences. For the USPS, leaving the UPU means negotiating individual postal agreements with every country in the world. That’s a logistical nightmare, in a boring sort of way. 

Follow Us for Less Boring Stuff

Atlas International Mail FacebookAtlas International Mail LinkedInAtlas International Mail to CanadaThe Last Boring UPU Meeting

Interesting Atlas ePackets

This is Boring, I Wanna Go Home

Leaving the UPU Universal Postal Union

The USA is Leaving the UPU (Universal Postal Union)

The White House announced it is leaving a 144 year old global postal agreement due to the current trade war with China. China benefits from significantly lower postage costs thanks to a decades old agreement to help poor and developing nations with lower postage rates. China is now the second largest economy in the world, and China should no longer be classified as a poor or developing country. Something must be done to level the playing field, but leaving the UPU only stands to isolate the US.  Many other countries, including all US allies, are facing the same inequities and are working with the UPU to negotiate fair terminal dues. With the US withdrawing, China now has one less party voting for a fair deal.

Leaving the UPU May Severely Damage the USPS

For the USPS, leaving the UPU would mean negotiating individual postal agreements with 190 countries. The US withdrawal from the UPU gives the USPS 12 months to do that. Negotiating on our own rather than collectively with other countries would likely lead to higher export prices. It’s a logistical nightmare waiting to happen, and the USPS will bear the brunt of it. The USPS has been losing money delivering below-cost items from China, but it may get worse. They may lose the international business altogether to private delivery companies like FedEx and UPS. These private companies were influential in the White House’s decision to withdraw from the UPU. The private companies already have negotiated rates in place to take shares of the multi-billion dollar business. They stand to benefit at the expense of the United States Postal Service.

Trade War with China

Leaving the UPU may just be another threat in order to garner attention to an ongoing issue, the trade war with China.  The White House has been withdrawing the US from international agreements at an alarming rate. (NAFTA, The Trans-Pacific Partnership, The Iran deal, Treaty of Amity, The Paris Climate Accords, UNESCO, International Coffee Agreement, Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty …) New agreements have been made with small concessions, and newly established agreements are the same long standing agreements branded differently. Perhaps this will be another aggrandizing move that changes little or nothing, but there is a lot at stake.

One Year to Create New Postal Agreements

Withdrawing from the UPU will take a year. This is not enough time to create 190 bilateral postal agreements with all the countries of the world, but it is certainly enough time, along with our allies in the rest of the world, to negotiate fair terminal dues with China. Withdrawing from the UPU will only benefit a few large private delivery companies (UPS, FedEx, DHL.) The costs to US businesses that ship overseas, US consumers, and the USPS are too great to risk. The US is one of the founding members of the UPU, a union of nearly every country in the world that has benefited billions for 144 years. Leaving the UPU now has many unknown consequences, and it only stands to benefit a small amount of people. Diplomacy is the best solution for America. Along with our allies, we need to negotiate a better deal.

Next Post     Atlas International Mail to Canada

UPU Postal Congress

Home

Epacket , Global Trade , international mail
Leaving the UPU Universal Postal Union

The USA is Leaving the UPU (Universal Postal Union)

The White House announced it is leaving a 144 year old global postal agreement due to the current trade war with China. China benefits from significantly lower postage costs thanks to a decades old agreement to help poor and developing nations with lower postage rates. China is now the second largest economy in the world, and China should no longer be classified as a poor or developing country. Something must be done to level the playing field, but leaving the UPU only stands to isolate the US.  Many other countries, including all US allies, are facing the same inequities and are working with the UPU to negotiate fair terminal dues. With the US withdrawing, China now has one less party voting for a fair deal.

Leaving the UPU May Severely Damage the USPS

For the USPS, leaving the UPU would mean negotiating individual postal agreements with 190 countries. The US withdrawal from the UPU gives the USPS 12 months to do that. Negotiating on our own rather than collectively with other countries would likely lead to higher export prices. It’s a logistical nightmare waiting to happen, and the USPS will bear the brunt of it. The USPS has been losing money delivering below-cost items from China, but it may get worse. They may lose the international business altogether to private delivery companies like FedEx and UPS. These private companies were influential in the White House’s decision to withdraw from the UPU. The private companies already have negotiated rates in place to take shares of the multi-billion dollar business. They stand to benefit at the expense of the United States Postal Service.

Trade War with China

Leaving the UPU may just be another threat in order to garner attention to an ongoing issue, the trade war with China.  The White House has been withdrawing the US from international agreements at an alarming rate. (NAFTA, The Trans-Pacific Partnership, The Iran deal, Treaty of Amity, The Paris Climate Accords, UNESCO, International Coffee Agreement, Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty …) New agreements have been made with small concessions, and newly established agreements are the same long standing agreements branded differently. Perhaps this will be another aggrandizing move that changes little or nothing, but there is a lot at stake.

One Year to Create New Postal Agreements

Withdrawing from the UPU will take a year. This is not enough time to create 190 bilateral postal agreements with all the countries of the world, but it is certainly enough time, along with our allies in the rest of the world, to negotiate fair terminal dues with China. Withdrawing from the UPU will only benefit a few large private delivery companies (UPS, FedEx, DHL.) The costs to US businesses that ship overseas, US consumers, and the USPS are too great to risk. The US is one of the founding members of the UPU, a union of nearly every country in the world that has benefited billions for 144 years. Leaving the UPU now has many unknown consequences, and it only stands to benefit a small amount of people. Diplomacy is the best solution for America. Along with our allies, we need to negotiate a better deal.

Next Post     Atlas International Mail to Canada

UPU Postal Congress

Home

Grow your Business in Emerging Markets

E-commerce Parcel Delivery

It’s time to increase your global sales. The four largest emerging markets, the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) are the fastest developing economies in the world. The burgeoning middle classes in these emerging markets make them the best for e-commerce growth. China alone, accounts for 40% of the world’s total e-commerce.  Atlas offers customized solutions to reach customers in these critical markets.

Don’t be left behind, by 2020, nearly 2 billion emerging market consumers will be spending as much as $30 trillion.  Already, more than 80% of online consumers live outside the US. The limited range of international products from eCommerce companies in emerging markets drives demand for global parcel delivery. With improved delivery routes, emerging market E-commerce parcel delivery is expanding at triple the domestic rate.  Atlas offers an assortment of cost-efficient shipping services for all your goods and parcels. Customized solutions include track & trace services, automated completion of customs export documentation,  and prepayment of duties & taxes.

International Marketing Mail

Marketing Mail has a high acceptance level and can help you get a foothold in emerging markets. Above all it catches customers attention and shows them that you are different. Even more, customers are personally addressed with a  1 to 1 marketing communication. Therefore it ensures that your company stays in their memory. It is also less costly than TV commercials, better targeted than magazine or newspaper advertising, and is an excellent complement to a multi-channel marketing campaign.

Atlas offers a variety of delivery methods to ensure your marketing campaigns are a success. We offer direct entry giving your campaign the benefit of a local or regional identity. We also provide international address correction and standardization, complete all the required customs documentation, and offer same day pickup anywhere in the US.

Also, you can follow the links below, and learn more about Atlas’s services.

Atlas International Mail to CanadaHome Atlas International FacebookAtlas International Mail LinkedIn@AtlasSteve

Direct Mail Marketing , E-Commerce Delivery , Epacket , Global Trade , international mail , International Mailing Services , Parcel Delivery , Subscription Boxes
Grow your Business in Emerging Markets

E-commerce Parcel Delivery

It’s time to increase your global sales. The four largest emerging markets, the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) are the fastest developing economies in the world. The burgeoning middle classes in these emerging markets make them the best for e-commerce growth. China alone, accounts for 40% of the world’s total e-commerce.  Atlas offers customized solutions to reach customers in these critical markets.

Don’t be left behind, by 2020, nearly 2 billion emerging market consumers will be spending as much as $30 trillion.  Already, more than 80% of online consumers live outside the US. The limited range of international products from eCommerce companies in emerging markets drives demand for global parcel delivery. With improved delivery routes, emerging market E-commerce parcel delivery is expanding at triple the domestic rate.  Atlas offers an assortment of cost-efficient shipping services for all your goods and parcels. Customized solutions include track & trace services, automated completion of customs export documentation,  and prepayment of duties & taxes.

International Marketing Mail

Marketing Mail has a high acceptance level and can help you get a foothold in emerging markets. Above all it catches customers attention and shows them that you are different. Even more, customers are personally addressed with a  1 to 1 marketing communication. Therefore it ensures that your company stays in their memory. It is also less costly than TV commercials, better targeted than magazine or newspaper advertising, and is an excellent complement to a multi-channel marketing campaign.

Atlas offers a variety of delivery methods to ensure your marketing campaigns are a success. We offer direct entry giving your campaign the benefit of a local or regional identity. We also provide international address correction and standardization, complete all the required customs documentation, and offer same day pickup anywhere in the US.

Also, you can follow the links below, and learn more about Atlas’s services.

Atlas International Mail to CanadaHome Atlas International FacebookAtlas International Mail LinkedIn@AtlasSteve